January 3, 2018

Book Talk | An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson

Book Talk | An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret RogersonAn Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson
Publisher: Margaret K. McElderry Books, September 2017
Pages: 300
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A skilled painter must stand up to the ancient power of the faerie courts—even as she falls in love with a faerie prince—in this gorgeous debut novel.
Isobel is a prodigy portrait artist with a dangerous set of clients: the sinister fair folk, immortal creatures who cannot bake bread, weave cloth, or put a pen to paper without crumbling to dust. They crave human Craft with a terrible thirst, and Isobel’s paintings are highly prized. But when she receives her first royal patron—Rook, the autumn prince—she makes a terrible mistake. She paints mortal sorrow in his eyes—a weakness that could cost him his life.

Furious and devastated, Rook spirits her away to the autumnlands to stand trial for her crime. Waylaid by the Wild Hunt’s ghostly hounds, the tainted influence of the Alder King, and hideous monsters risen from barrow mounds, Isobel and Rook depend on one another for survival. Their alliance blossoms into trust, then love—and that love violates the fair folks’ ruthless laws. Now both of their lives are forfeit, unless Isobel can use her skill as an artist to fight the fairy courts. Because secretly, her Craft represents a threat the fair folk have never faced in all the millennia of their unchanging lives: for the first time, her portraits have the power to make them feel.

Isabel is a careful woman. Instead of asking for eternal youth or perfect hair spells from her faerie clients, she trades protective spells for her renown portraits. When Rook, the autumn Faerie prince sits for her, Isabel can’t help but fall in love with him. But when his portrait creates unrest in the Autumn court, Rook holds Isabel responsible and takes her to the faerie lands to stand trial. Their journey is soon fruaght with danger, from the Wild Hunt to former friends. In the end, it’s up to Isabel, a mortal with a well-loved trade, to save them all.

Loved:
  • The worldbuilding was stunning. The differences between each court created not only fascinating settings but gorgeous atmosphere and cultures.
  • An Enchantment of Ravenis not set up for a sequel. Don’t get me wrong, I like sequels, but this characteristic makes this book stand out.
  • Margaret Rogerson created the perfect, slightly creepy faerie tale that I want to read again and again. Reminiscent of the Grimm fairy talesAn Enchantment of Ravens had that unique, uncanny quality that makes me want to look over my shoulder at the same time as marvel at her world.
  • The narrative dropped me deep into the story; instead of sitting on my couch on a cloudy weekend day, I was running with Rook and Isabel with the Great Hunt nipping at our heels. I tore through the final, tense scenes, barely aware of what was going on around me.
  • I loved the complexity of not only Isabel and Rook, but the supporting characters. No one was what they appeared, adding an additional layer of intricacy to the protagonists’ motives.
Liked:
  • The faerie hierarchy was fascinating, but I wanted more. The intricate details of who, where, why, when would have made An Enchantment of Ravens more powerful.
  • Same goes for the rules guarding faerie behavior. While interesting, there wasn’t enough context to make some actions make sense.
Loathed:
  • While I understand why Rogerson skimmed over some of Isabel’s initial infatuation with Rook, it left out some key emotions that built up her mindset when he appeared in the night to take her to trial.
Snapshot review:

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Recommended for:

YA fantasy lovers, Grimms’ fairy tale fans, and those looking for a unique take on the typical fairy tale.

 

4 Stars

Posted January 3, 2018 by Ellen in reviews / 0 Comments
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