October 11, 2016

You Might Like… | 10 Books I Found on GoodReads

Top Ten Tuesday

I’m a creature of habit. From my coffee order to my daily tasks at work, I like sticking to the familiar. The same extends to books: I have a tendency to stay with familiar authors and storylines. That’s where GoodReads saves the day.

Without the GoodReads recommendation feature and the ability to see books your friends are reading, I would still be reading the same books over and over again. Thanks to GoodReads, I’ve discovered books like Six of CrowsCinderThe Star-Touched Queen. Here are the top books I fell in love with thanks to GoodReads!

You Deserve a Drink: Boozy Misadventures and Tales of Debauchery


You Deserve a Drink by Mamrie Hart

Because, really. You do.



The Girl on the Train


The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

A must read before you see the movie.



Passenger (Passenger, #1)


Passenger by Alexandra Bracken

Science fiction meets a powerful magical family in this tale of time benders.



Illuminae (The Illuminae Files, #1)


Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

A modern YA science fiction full of suspense, romance, and amazing typography. Add in computer reminiscent of Hal and you’ve got a winner.



Romancing the Duke (Castles Ever After, #1)

Romancing the Duke by Tessa Dare

One of the best historical romance authors of our time strikes again with this major winner. Romancing the Duke is one of my all time favs.




The Fairest of Them All


The Fairest of Them All by Carolyn Turgeon

The classic fairy tale Rapunzel is turned on its head in this remarkable fairy tale retelling.



A Court of Thorns and Roses (A Court of Thorns and Roses, #1)


A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas

Quite simply the ultimate fairy tale retelling





Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell

The queen of feel-good reading has another winner in Fangirl.



These Broken Stars (Starbound, #1)


These Broken Stars by Amie Kaufman and Megan Spooner

Kaufman and Spooner hit it out of the park in this YA science fiction, threaded with incredibly vivid characters and heartbreakingly romantic scenes.



Me Before You (Me Before You, #1)


Me Before You by Jojo Moyes

A stunningly romantic, beautiful story of two lost people finding themselves in each other.

Posted October 11, 2016 by Ellen in top ten tuesday / 0 Comments
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October 3, 2016

Review | The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

Review | The Raven Boys by Maggie StiefvaterThe Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater
Series: The Raven Cycle, #1
Publisher: Scholastic Press, September 2012
Pages: 409
Format: Hardcover
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Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as the soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue never sees them--until this year, when a boy emerges from the dark and speaks to her.
His name is Gansey, a rich student at Aglionby, the local private school. Blue has a policy of staying away from Aglionby boys. Known as Raven Boys, they can only mean trouble.
But Blue is drawn to Gansey, in a way she can't entirely explain. He is on a quest that has encompassed three other Raven Boys: Adam, the scholarship student who resents the privilege around him; Ronan, the fierce soul whose emotions range from anger to despair; and Noah, the taciturn watcher who notices many things but says very little.
For as long as she can remember, Blue has been warned that she will cause her true love to die. She doesn't believe in true love, and never thought this would be a problem. But as her life becomes caught up in the strange and sinister world of the Raven Boys, she's not so sure anymore.

Blue Sargent wants nothing to do the raven boys, the prized students of the local rich-kid academy who run through Henrietta, Virginia like it’s their playground. But when her amplifier gift (to improve the psychic gifts of those around her) brings her face-to-face with the spirit of a raven boy, Blue is hooked. Who is he? How can she save him? Despite herself, Blue is soon caught up in a world of intrigue, long-lost kings, mystical favors, and hidden magic.

The thing about Blue is she seems pretty normal for living in a house full of psychics. She may not bat an eye at the tarot card readings, the random mumblings of her mother’s best friend (who also lives there), or think to gather the names of the soon-to-be-dead weird, but at heart, she’s a typical teenage girl. One who wants to find her place, something we can all understand.

Except Blue has a secret or, rather a curse. If she kisses her true love, he’ll die, but the spirits don’t share how. To take precautions, she’s just not kissing anyone. It’s this combination of pragmatic and mysticism that makes Blue so enchanting. But don’t get me wrong – The Raven Boys isn’t about her.

The stars of the novel are, without a doubt, the four Raven Boys: Gansey, the get-along guy driven to discover the secret of Glendower; Ronan Lynch, the brawler haunted by a horrible secret; Adam Parrish, the local scholarship student trying to find a way to fit in; and Noah, the quiet, unassuming one. Their internal relationship dynamics are fascinating reading; add in Blue’s sensibility, and you’ve got quite the story.

The paranormal aspect brings The Raven Boys to a whole new level. When Blue sees Gansey’s spirit on the corpse road, she can’t stop thinking about him. And when she meets him in real life, her determination to protect him solidifies. The complexity of teenage angst and romance set against the paranormal history and the mystical quest to discover Glendower creates a world that I just didn’t want to leave.

4 Stars

Posted October 3, 2016 by Ellen in reviews / 0 Comments
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October 2, 2016

Review | Tempt Me by Twilight by Lisa Kleypas

Review | Tempt Me by Twilight by Lisa KleypasTempt Me at Twilight by Lisa Kleypas
Series: The Hathaways, #3
Publisher: St. Martin's Paperbacks, September 2009
Pages: 373
Format: Paperback
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He was everything she'd sworn to avoid.
Poppy Hathaway loves her unconventional family, though she longs for normalcy. Then fate leads to a meeting with Harry Rutledge, an enigmatic hotel owner and inventor with wealth, power, and a dangerous hidden life. When their flirtation compromises her own reputation, Poppy shocks everyone by accepting his proposal—only to find that her new husband offers his passion, but not his trust.
And she was everything he needed.
Harry was willing to do anything to win Poppy—except to open his heart. All his life, he has held the world at arm’s length…but the sharp, beguiling Poppy demands to be his wife in every way that matters. Still, as desire grows between them, an enemy lurks in the shadows. Now if Harry wants to keep Poppy by his side, he must forge a true union of body and soul, once and for all...

At first, I didn’t know how to feel about Tempt Me at Twilight‘s romantic hero, Harry Rutledge.

Scratch that.

For the first half of the novel, I didn’t know how to feel about Harry Rutledge.

He’s ruthless, especially when it comes to getting what he wants. A self-made man, Rutledge has created his success and is therefore fiercely defensive of it. He thrives on his business and vice versa. He has reached his wildest dreams: to make his mark among the rich and famous. So when he sees something he wants, he takes it.

Unfortunately, when it comes to Poppy Hathaway, it doesn’t work the way he planned.

I loved Rutledge at first. He was the hardened businessman, the one that never believed in love, especially not for himself. He was the reluctant underdog, the one fighting to win the chance at her hand. Then he made what I would consider some pretty bad decisions. I have to admit; I was close to putting this book down. But it was Poppy who saved both Rutledge and Tempt Me at Twilight.

Poppy is Rutledge’s foil in every sense of the word. Where he’s a tough-minded businessman, she’s a softer, family-focused woman. It’s this simple yin yang that adds life to both the narration and its hero. She makes him relatable, forgiving, even kind.

Like Poppy, I struggled with Rutledge, but also like her, I found the soft in him. It was the saving grace of Tempt Me at Twilight, the element that made me stay up half the night to finish it; that had me setting aside the book with a sigh when I finished. Their relationship creates this magic that brings the whole novel alive.

Despite the hiccups with Rutledge in the beginning, I fell madly in love with both him and Poppy. Tempt Me at Twilight brought all the charismatic, vibrant characters and the romantic storyline that made Kleypas a household name. And I loved it.

4 Stars

Posted October 2, 2016 by Ellen in reviews / 0 Comments
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October 1, 2016

September 2016 | Monthly Rewind

Pop Goes the Reader

It’s here! It’s finally autumn, time for turning leaves, gorgeous sunsets, dark lipstick, and the wonderful coffee drinks. Goodbye September, hello October.


September was a pretty good month. I started to hit my stride again with the blog, and after doing a little research, plan to devote some October weekend time to the maintenance side of the house. Keeping up with reviews is still a struggle, but you know, that’s okay.

We made major progress on the wedding planning! I found my dress and couldn’t love it more. Thanks to Danielle and Angela at Lace and Liberty for patiently explaining the differences between wedding skirts and putting up with my lack of balance for an hour. I couldn’t have hoped for a better experience!

Also, we hit our first wedding hiccup. I designed the map on the back of our invitations and sent it to print. What I didn’t realize was that they didn’t just add my map to the back – they recreated it. Okay, fine…until the invitations arrived. 45 cards of major typos (like “in” instead of “inn”…). The envelopes have misprints, a technology this company claims as their name to fame. They fixed the cards, but I’m still waiting on the envelopes. Ugh.

Bay of Sighs (The Guardians Trilogy, #2)A Lady by Midnight (Spindle Cove, #3)Red Storm RisingDelphineThe Star-Touched Queen (The Star-Touched Queen, #1)Tailored for Trouble (Happy Pants, #1)Lord Dashwood Missed Out (Spindle Cove, #4.5)The Forbidden OrchidN Is For Noose (Kinsey Millhone, #14)Not Quite Mine (Not Quite, #2)Tempt Me at Twilight (The Hathaways, #3)Apprentice in Death (In Death, #43)


September favorite review: The Star-Touched Queen by Roshani Chokshi

September favorite read: Lord Dashwood Missed Out by Tessa Dare

I’m hooked on:

  • Starbucks’ Chile Mocha with soy milk. Oh, my heavens. This mocha is quickly becoming a Sunday morning staple! I love the sweet and spicy combo – it takes away a lot of the intense flavor that I don’t like in mochas. But this one? Just right.
  • I picked up the Oh She Glows Every Day cookbook and, you guys, I’m in love. I’m not a vegan, but her recipes hit the spot. Her Every Day Glow salad has become my go-to power lunch.
  • Sarah J. Maas’ Empire of Storms playlist has been dominating my Spotify this month. What can I say? I’m hooked!



Posted October 1, 2016 by Ellen in monthly rewind / 0 Comments
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September 30, 2016

Review | Not Quite Mine by Catherine Bybee

Review | Not Quite Mine by Catherine BybeeNot Quite Mine by Catherine Bybee
Series: Not Quite, #2
Publisher: Montlake Romance, May 2013
Pages: 302
Format: Paperback
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Gorgeous hotel heiress Katelyn “Katie” Morrison seems to have it all. But when she crosses paths with Dean Prescott—the only man she’s ever loved—at her brother’s wedding, Katie realizes there’s a gaping hole in her life. After the ceremony she gets an even bigger surprise: a baby girl left on her doorstep. Determined to keep the newborn until she learns who her mother is, Katie has her hands full and doesn’t need Dean snooping around…especially when his presence stirs feelings she thought were long gone.

Dean Prescott knows Katie is lying to him about the baby. He shouldn’t care what the woman who broke his heart is up to…and he most certainly shouldn’t still be aching for her. Yet Dean can’t ignore the need to protect Katie—or the desire to be near her every chance he gets. But when he and Katie solve the mystery surrounding the baby, their second chance for happiness could be shattered forever.

Hotel heiress Katie dreamed of a child, but when one finally arrives, it’s not the way she expects. Finding an abandoned infant on her doorstep, complete with a note giving her custody and a birth certificate naming her as the mother leaves her feeling elated and confused all at once. With her ex, Dean, hot on her trail, Katie heads to the west coast, baby in tow, to start her new life as an interior designer for the family’s hotel chain.

I wanted so badly to love this book. It has all the potential to be a cute romantic comedy, but it fails miserably.

I couldn’t get a handle on Katie. She was so many different characters – the reformed wild child, the annoying little sister, the wannabe mother, the ex that never grew up, the responsible woman – all at once that it was hard to understand what was going on. Her motives were all over the place, making me roll my eyes more than once at her antics. When she starts running around in a construction zone in high heels and a miniskirt, I was done.

Dean was just as irritating. Another reformed rich boy, he’s cranky, irritable, incredibly nosy, and still in love with Katie. While their relationship had potential, the magic wasn’t there. Instead of dreamy, Dean felt infatuated instead of love-struck.

Both characters were completely unrelatable. From Katie’s gobs of money (she never considers the cost of anything) to the View Spoiler », the Not Quite Mine thrives on the lives of the rich and famous, portraying them as far too materialistic. While I love the odd billionaire or two, Bybee didn’t give either character faults or flaws that made them relatable.

I didn’t give a hoot about Katie or Dean at the end of the book – I was thoroughly irritated with the both of them. The unnecessary drama from both of them was just too much. I was glad to turn Not Quite Mine back in.

2 Stars

Posted September 30, 2016 by Ellen in reviews / 0 Comments
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September 29, 2016

Review | Apprentice in Death by J.D. Robb

Review | Apprentice in Death by J.D. RobbApprentice in Death by J.D. Robb
Series: In Death, #43
Publisher: Berkley, September 2016
Pages: 375
Format: Hardcover
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The shots came quickly, silently, and with deadly accuracy. Within seconds, three people were dead at Central Park’s ice skating rink. The victims: a talented young skater, a doctor, and a teacher. As random as random can be.
Eve Dallas has seen a lot of killers during her time with the NYPSD, but never one like this. After reviewing security videos, it becomes clear that the victims were killed by a sniper firing a tactical laser rifle, who could have been miles away when the trigger was pulled. And though the locations where the shooter could have set up seem endless, the list of people with that particular skill set is finite: police, military, professional killer.
Eve’s husband, Roarke, has unlimited resources—and genius—at his disposal. And when his computer program leads Eve to the location of the sniper, she learns a shocking fact: There were two—one older, one younger. Someone is being trained by an expert in the science of killing, and they have an agenda. Central Park was just a warm-up. And as another sniper attack shakes the city to its core, Eve realizes that though we’re all shaped by the people around us, there are those who are just born evil...

Master and apprentice in death. It’s a new take for Lieutenant Eve Dallas, Homicide. She faced down lovers, loners, psychopaths and worse. But when a long distance serial killer (think sniper) starts killing in New York City, Eve has a feeling she may be out of her depth.

I couldn’t get into this book at first. After waiting (im)patiently for the latest book in the In Death series, I expected a grand opening scene. The initial murder scene at the ice skating rink didn’t catch me at first. The connection, the viciousness that I’d come to expect from Robb’s villains didn’t stand out. Instead, it was cold, impersonal, and almost clinical.

As Apprentice in Death began to play out, the implications began to sink in. I realized that these villains, the master and apprentice, were unlike anything Eve has faced before. I was hooked into the massive manhunt for the serial killers for one reason: the psychological profiles.

The depth and variation in both the master and apprentice’s mindsets, motives, and rationale were intense, emotional, and entirely engaging. In other words, I loved it. The dueling narration of Eve’s hunt and the snipers’ thought processes fascinated me, pulling me deeper into the story than I ever imagined.

Most of Robb’s installments are what I would consider thrilling, but the gritty nature of this manhunt made it downright heart-stopping. Although it took a while for it to get started, Apprentice in Death lives up to Robb’s standards.

As thrilling as the new characters were, it was the returning cast that made me fall in love with this book. The dynamics between Peabody and Eve in Interview always add a thrill, and Roarke…well, Roarke is an entity unto himself. Their perfectly imperfect marriage is one of my favorite relationships in literature today.

I don’t know why I doubt it; Robb’s In Death series has won me over time and time again. Apprentice in Death was no different.

4 Stars

Posted September 29, 2016 by Ellen in reviews / 0 Comments
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September 28, 2016

Review | N is for Noose by Sue Grafton

Review | N is for Noose by Sue GraftonN Is For Noose by Sue Grafton
Series: Kinsey Millhone, #14
Publisher: Fawcett, January 1970
Pages: 322
Format: Paperback
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Tom Newquist had been a detective in the Nota Lake sheriffs office --- a tough, honest cop respected by everyone. When he died suddenly, the town folk were sad but not surprised. Just shy of sixty-five. Newquist worked too hard, drank too much, and exercised too little.
Newquist's widow, Selma, didn't doubt the coroner's report. But still, she couldn't help wondering what had so bothered Tom in the last six weeks of his life. What was it that had made him prowl restlessly at night and brood constantly? Determined to help Selma find the answer, Kinsey Millhone sets up shop in Nota Lake, where she finds that looking for a needle in a haystack can draw blood --- very likely, her own ...

Slipping back into Kinsey’s world is like returning home. It’s comforting, despite the murders and violence that undoubtedly appear in each installment, and familiar. When she undertakes a case on the road as a favor for her friend (is he her friend? Not sure) Robert Dietz, Kinsey finds herself in arguably the biggest mess she’s dealt with.

Tom Newquist was an all-around popular guy in Nota Lake, so when he’s found dead in his truck on the side of the road, the town reels. Even though he was one of two police investigators in the area, no one seems to hold a grudge against him, yet Selma, Newquist’s bizarre widow, can’t shake the feeling that there’s more to the story. Enter Kinsey.

N is for Noose isn’t a cut-and-dried murder mystery, at least, not in the beginning. Instead, Kinsey faces the wild dynamics of a small, tight-knit town, an employer whom she’s pretty sure doesn’t tell the whole truth (only when it suits her), and a nagging feeling in her stomach that just won’t go away. There’s something definitely wrong in Nota Lake…but what it is?

While Tom’s murder was the initial hook for the mystery, I was drawn into the town vs. Kinsey dynamic that permeated the pages. Kinsey was an outsider, asking questions that wasn’t any her never mind. Small towns generally don’t take too kindly to that. The friction and tension in the atmosphere created this draw, this intense need to read the next page, to know what happened.

N is for Noose had even more surprises lying in wait. After reading 13 of Grafton’s other books, I thought I had her pattern down pretty well. I even thought I knew who the killer was and why.

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Won’t make that mistake twice. She blew me away. The killer, the motive, the method…that final scene was just simply amazing.

4 Stars

Posted September 28, 2016 by Ellen in reviews / 0 Comments
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September 27, 2016

My Fall 2016 TBR!

Top Ten Tuesday


I love everything about fall, from the turning leaves and fall coffee drinks to the chance to wear my leggings on these glorious shorter days. But my favorite thing about fall, without a doubt, is the books.

Fall brings tons of book releases, from fantasy to YA to romance. Whatever suits your fancy, you’ll be able to find something to fit you. Here are the nine books that I can’t wait to read this fall!

Apprentice in Death by J.D. Robb

Robb’s In Death series is one of my all-time favorites. From Eve’s snappy banter to her determination to bring each and every criminal to justice, to the wide range of recurring characters to the vibrant one-time characters that grace individual books, I’m mad about these books. Apprentice in Death tells the story of two long range serial killers haunting the New York of 2061, and Lieutenant Eve Dallas’ hunt to find them.

Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake

I loved Blake’s Anna Dressed in Blood (although I admittedly slept with the lights on for a while), so when her Three Dark Crowns caught my eye, I knew I had to give it a try. I love the idea of the fantasy basis of this book. Add in the tension between these queens just in the blurb? I’m in.

Do You Want to Start a Scandal? by Tessa Dare

Shorter days and longer nights are perfect historical romance, and Tessa Dare is a must read for me. She’s funny, clever, and creates characters I can immediately relate to. Her Do You Want to Start a Scandal?, complete with the Clue-esqe element, is perfect for a slow fall evening.

Bright Smoke, Cold Fire by Rosamund Hodge

I’d pick up Hodge’s work no matter what, but a Romeo and Juliet retelling? YES PLEASE! Hodge’s retellings are musts on my rereads shelf, and I have the feeling that Bright Smoke, Cold Fire will be another.

Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo

While it took me a while to fall for Six of Crows, I can’t wait to get my hands on Crooked Kingdom this fall. Why? How Bardugo ended Six of Crows. I NEED TO KNOW!

Gemina by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

If you haven’t read Illuminae, you must. Really. There’s no other option. As to Gemina, can I have it now? Please?

Heartless by Marissa Meyer

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is one of my favorite tales. The movies, the books, even the makeup collections? I’m all in. But when you add Marissa Meyer, the author of The Lunar Chronicles (another series you need to read!)? Fabulous, darling.

Turbo Twenty-Three by Janet Evanovich

Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum series is my go-to fun, fluffy, happy series. I love Stephanie’s lighthearted goofiness (whether she realizes it or not), and the silly nature of the stories. It’s simply happy, fun reading and I can’t wait to get the next installment this fall.

The Fate of the Tearling by Erika Johansen

The Queen of the Tearling and The Invasion of the Tearling are such stunning books, building up to that grand final battle, the war of good against evil, light against dark. While I love the fantasy aspect of this series, it’s the protagonist Kelsea, that grabs me every time.

What books are on your fall TBR? What ones should I add to mine? Let me know below!

Posted September 27, 2016 by Ellen in top ten tuesday / 1 Comment

September 26, 2016

Review | The Forbidden Orchid by Sharon Biggs Waller

Review | The Forbidden Orchid by Sharon Biggs WallerThe Forbidden Orchid by Sharon Biggs Waller
Publisher: Viking, March 2016
Pages: 392
Format: Hardcover
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Staid, responsible Elodie Buchanan is the eldest of ten sisters living in a small English market town in 1861. The girls barely know their father, a plant hunter usually off adventuring through China. Then disaster strikes: Mr. Buchanan reneges on his contract to collect an extremely rare and valuable orchid. He will be thrown into debtors’ prison while his daughters are sent to the orphanage and the workhouse.
Elodie can’t stand by and see her family destroyed, so she persuades her father to return to China once more to try to hunt down the flower—only this time, despite everything she knows about her place in society, Elodie goes with him. She has never before left her village, but what starts as fear turns to wonder as she adapts to seafaring life aboard the tea clipper The Osprey, and later to the new sights, dangers, and romance of China. But now, even if she can find the orchid, how can she ever go back to being the staid, responsible Elodie that everybody needs?

It started the moment Elodie showed Deacon Wainwright the plant, the forbidden orchid blooming on top of the glass house her father built for her younger sisters. Soon, Elodie’s family is caught up in their father’s world, a place of mystique, secrets, and men that will stop at nothing to get what they want. Can Elodie save her family and her father’s reputation in the wilds of China?

I had some with this book, issues that kept the rating at three instead of four stars. While I realize the condescending attitude men showed towards the woman in The Forbidden Orchid may have been historically accurate, it was infuriating. At every turn, Elodie was told she couldn’t speak out, couldn’t ask questions, couldn’t look at an orchid because it might tempt her…Really? This effect would have been offset if there was one (ONE!) man that didn’t look down his nose at a woman, but it was rare. At first, I thought Elodie’s father, famed botanist and adventurer, would be the one but View Spoiler ». The closest was Alex, Elodie’s new husband, but even he had a few moments.

Regardless, I was hooked into The Forbidden Orchid from the first chapter. I loved the dynamics between Elodie and her nine sisters, how their mother coped as a woman essentially on her own, and their interactions with the townspeople. The level of detail with even the most minor of characters brought life to the book.

I loved Elodie and Alex’s relationship, although I may have rolled my eyes once or twice (or more) at some of Elodie’s reactions. They had the same sweet, enduring romance that caught my heart when I read Waller’s first foray into YA, A Mad, Wicked Folly. Besides bringing a little bit of light into a rather dark situation, it forced Elodie to grow up in ways she never would have had to in the family home in Kent.

Once Elodie, Alex, and her father land in China, I was hooked. Every detail came alive. I felt like I was walking in an 1800s opium den or riding a horse in the hot Chinese summer. It was vivid, memorable, and extraordinary.

While The Forbidden Orchid has some misses, its hits by far make up for them.

3 Stars

Posted September 26, 2016 by Ellen in reviews / 0 Comments
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September 25, 2016

Review | Lord Dashwood Missed Out by Tessa Dare

Review | Lord Dashwood Missed Out by Tessa DareLord Dashwood Missed Out by Tessa Dare
Series: Spindle Cove, #4.5
Publisher: Avon Impulse, December 2015
Pages: 144
Format: Paperback
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A snowstorm hath no fury like a spinster scorned!
Miss Elinora Browning grew up yearning for the handsome, intelligent lord-next-door…but he left England without a word of farewell. One night, inspired by a bit too much sherry, Nora poured out her heartbreak on paper. Lord Dashwood Missed Out was a love letter to every young lady who’d been overlooked by gentlemen—and an instant bestseller. Now she’s on her way to speak in Spindle Cove when snowy weather delays her coach. She’s forced to wait out the storm with the worst possible companion: Lord Dashwood himself.
And he finally seems to have noticed her.
George Travers, Lord Dashwood, has traveled the globe as a cartographer. He returned to England with the goal of marrying and creating an heir--only to find his reputation shredded by an audacious, vexingly attractive bluestocking and her poison pen. Lord Dashwood Missed Out, his arse. Since Nora Browning seems to believe he overlooked the passion of a lifetime, Dash challenges her to prove it.
She has one night.

Fueled by the rocketing emotions of a broken heart (and a few glasses of sherry), Miss Elinora Browning puts pen to paper to explain just why the dashing Lord Dashwood, childhood friend and longtime crush, missed out when he left her behind to explore the high seas. The last thing she expects, however, is to be face-to-face with him on her travels to Spindle Cove…or for the carriage to break down in the middle of their journey. Backed against a wall by Dashwood’s demands for clarification, her own heart, and the past, it’s up to Nora to show him just what he missed out on.

I’m not a huge fan of novellas. Normally there isn’t enough room to develop the characters, to create a believable story, a realistic world, to make me fall in love. Thankfully, Lord Dashwood Missed Out not only met but beat my expectations on each score.

Dare created their relationship so perfectly that I never questioned it. Dashwood and Nora’s conversations about their past, combined with their separate narrative flashbacks, built up their backstory and created the perfect environment for their story to continue.

While both Nora and Dashwood fit character stereotypes, there wasn’t much typical about them. While most of us have emotion-fueled letters to our exes in our diaries, most of us today don’t share them, let alone publish them. For a woman to take such a stand, especially against a member of the aristocracy, in that time period was something, and I adored Nora for it. Dashwood, in turn, was just as complex. I loved the surprising twists to his character, the romantic hidden behind the hard exterior.

Lord Dashwood Missed Out was clever, funny, and simply fun to read. I loved their story, and wished for it to be a full-length novel. I wanted more of the banter, the bickering, the romance, the friction that was constantly between Dashwood and Nora. By far, Lord Dashwood Missed Out is my favorite novella.

4 Stars

Posted September 25, 2016 by Ellen in reviews / 0 Comments
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